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Bamboo Flooring Reviews Pros And Cons

Bamboo Flooring Reviews Pros And Cons

Bamboo flooring is surprisingly low maintenance for a natural hardwood flooring option. As the kitchen is the most highly trafficked room in your home, selecting a flooring that is especially easy to maintain is supremely important. To maintain your bamboo flooring, periodic buffing of the wax is required if wax was used to prevent absorption of moisture. Most bamboo flooring, however, is treated with a polyurethane layer that protects it surface. Regular cleaning of dust/grit/particles, etc. with a stiff-bristle broom will help prevent scratching. Because bamboo flooring is susceptible to water damage, the floor should never be soaked when mopping; use of a damp mop to clean the floors is all that is needed.FlexibilityBamboo flooring is one of the softer hardwood flooring options. While this can be a negative, especially in wet or humid conditions, the flexibility of the floor makes it simpler to install, more versatile, and easier to update or refinish.Cons to Bamboo FlooringWith all of the positives listed above, I’m sure you’re ready to rn out and invest in bamboo flooring for your kitchen immediately. However, there are a few cons to bamboo flooring you should consider before committing: While bamboo flooring is one of the least expensive and softest of the natural flooring options, if you purchase bamboo flooring that is on the cheaper end, you may end up with bamboo flooring that is too soft, leaving it extra prone to scratches and possibly water damage. Most bamboo flooring is listed as either Grade A or Grade B, however there’s little to no actual regulation of bamboo flooring, leaving it up to the manufacturers discretion as to what makes second quality flooring. If you are choosing to purchase bamboo flooring for any room in your home, it’s important that you investigate any company before you purchase to find out general customer satisfaction, details of any warranty they may offer, and their purchasing and bamboo harvesting practices. Many companies will also provide samples of their different products, which is a good way to test the flooring in your home prior to purchasing.Another reason to reconsider installing bamboo flooring in your kitchen is if you have larger pets, especially dogs. Pets’ nails are not great for bamboo flooring, or for most hardwood options, as they are much more likely to leave scratches in the softer wood. If you do have pets and are wanting bamboo flooring, you should consider extra layers of the polyurethane finishing to protect them. And finally, one last reason you may be hesitant to install bamboo flooring in your kitchen is that, while bamboo flooring is very trendy, the contemporary design may not fit the style of your home. For this reason, bamboo flooring is an especially attractive option in new construction, but possibly not the best choice in a renovated older home.
bamboo flooring reviews pros and cons 1

Bamboo Flooring Reviews Pros And Cons

Is bamboo for you? Bamboo flooring has evolved into one of the biggest segments of the wood flooring industry over the past 10 years. That’s because it’s much cheaper and more durable than most wood flooring options out there. Is it for you? Here’s a bamboo flooring primer. First of all, bamboo isn’t wood at all. It’s a type of grass, the biggest grass in the world, and there are dozens of varieties. The one most often used for flooring, called Moso bamboo, is from China and other parts of Asia. Bamboo is processed in a few different ways to make flooring. “Stranded” bamboo is by far the biggest section of the bamboo flooring market. It’s made by shredding the stalks into long strands and then compressing them into the final solid form using heat and plastic binders. It’s available as tongue-and-groove flooring that’s nailed down, or the click-together style, the same choices for most laminate and engineered plank floors. The hardness and durability of stranded bamboo flooring exceed that of any domestic solid wood flooring available. The dozens of colors available allow you to choose flooring that’s shaded like cherry, ash, oak or just about any other wood species. However, since stranded bamboo doesn’t have natural wood grain, few would mistake it for the real deal. If you want the actual look of bamboo, choose “horizontal” bamboo flooring. Instead of being shredded, the bamboo stalks are cut into thin strips, which are then laminated together to form the planks. You can see the grain and nodes (the “knuckles” on bamboo stalks) in the flooring. However, horizontal bamboo flooring isn’t nearly as hard as stranded, so it isn’t the best bamboo choice if your floor will get heavy use or abuse. The least expensive bamboo option is engineered bamboo flooring. It has a thin layer of bamboo laminated onto plywood, the same type of construction used for other engineered flooring. (You won’t find too many choices in this category.) Bamboo does have a couple of downsides. Because it’s grass, not wood, it’s more affected by moisture than other flooring choices. It will swell substantially more than wood or other types of flooring, so avoid installing it in damp areas and use care when mopping. And unlike wood flooring, bamboo can never be sanded down and refinished. You can find bamboo flooring at any home center, but if you want to see a larger selection, go to lumberliquidators.com. You can order it there or use the store locator if you prefer to shop in person. Types of bamboo flooring Back to Top
bamboo flooring reviews pros and cons 2

Bamboo Flooring Reviews Pros And Cons

Bamboo flooring is one of the softer hardwood flooring options. While this can be a negative, especially in wet or humid conditions, the flexibility of the floor makes it simpler to install, more versatile, and easier to update or refinish.Cons to Bamboo FlooringWith all of the positives listed above, I’m sure you’re ready to rn out and invest in bamboo flooring for your kitchen immediately. However, there are a few cons to bamboo flooring you should consider before committing: While bamboo flooring is one of the least expensive and softest of the natural flooring options, if you purchase bamboo flooring that is on the cheaper end, you may end up with bamboo flooring that is too soft, leaving it extra prone to scratches and possibly water damage. Most bamboo flooring is listed as either Grade A or Grade B, however there’s little to no actual regulation of bamboo flooring, leaving it up to the manufacturers discretion as to what makes second quality flooring. If you are choosing to purchase bamboo flooring for any room in your home, it’s important that you investigate any company before you purchase to find out general customer satisfaction, details of any warranty they may offer, and their purchasing and bamboo harvesting practices. Many companies will also provide samples of their different products, which is a good way to test the flooring in your home prior to purchasing.Another reason to reconsider installing bamboo flooring in your kitchen is if you have larger pets, especially dogs. Pets’ nails are not great for bamboo flooring, or for most hardwood options, as they are much more likely to leave scratches in the softer wood. If you do have pets and are wanting bamboo flooring, you should consider extra layers of the polyurethane finishing to protect them. And finally, one last reason you may be hesitant to install bamboo flooring in your kitchen is that, while bamboo flooring is very trendy, the contemporary design may not fit the style of your home. For this reason, bamboo flooring is an especially attractive option in new construction, but possibly not the best choice in a renovated older home.
bamboo flooring reviews pros and cons 3

Bamboo Flooring Reviews Pros And Cons

While bamboo flooring is one of the least expensive and softest of the natural flooring options, if you purchase bamboo flooring that is on the cheaper end, you may end up with bamboo flooring that is too soft, leaving it extra prone to scratches and possibly water damage. Most bamboo flooring is listed as either Grade A or Grade B, however there’s little to no actual regulation of bamboo flooring, leaving it up to the manufacturers discretion as to what makes second quality flooring. If you are choosing to purchase bamboo flooring for any room in your home, it’s important that you investigate any company before you purchase to find out general customer satisfaction, details of any warranty they may offer, and their purchasing and bamboo harvesting practices. Many companies will also provide samples of their different products, which is a good way to test the flooring in your home prior to purchasing.Another reason to reconsider installing bamboo flooring in your kitchen is if you have larger pets, especially dogs. Pets’ nails are not great for bamboo flooring, or for most hardwood options, as they are much more likely to leave scratches in the softer wood. If you do have pets and are wanting bamboo flooring, you should consider extra layers of the polyurethane finishing to protect them. And finally, one last reason you may be hesitant to install bamboo flooring in your kitchen is that, while bamboo flooring is very trendy, the contemporary design may not fit the style of your home. For this reason, bamboo flooring is an especially attractive option in new construction, but possibly not the best choice in a renovated older home.

Bamboo Flooring Reviews Pros And Cons

Bamboo Flooring Reviews Pros And Cons
Bamboo Flooring Reviews Pros And Cons
Bamboo Flooring Reviews Pros And Cons

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